Optalysys was formed to solve some of the fundamental limitations of conventional computing. This comes at a time when the unquenchable thirst for faster processing ever expanding volumes of data comes face to face with the impending demise of Moore's Law. 

 

Our optical co-processors use low power laser light, rather than electricity, to perform processor intensive convolution functions in parallel at incredibly high speeds and resolutions, yet taking only a fraction of the energy used by electronic processors. 

Such functions are the basis of Convolutional Neural Networks (CNNs).  CNNs are a burgeoning area of Deep Learning, used to classify and recognise images in applications including autonomous vehicles to recognise and make intelligent judgements on signs or obstacles on the road; in medical image analysis to identify potential causes of a patient’s symptoms so surgeons can make better informed decisions and in weather forecasting to more accurately predict the next natural disaster. 

Our technology is hugely scalable - our first systems already offer an order of magnitude performance increase over top end graphics processors. Our upcoming systems will see this capability push beyond the limits of what can be realised through conventional computing, by employing the most naturally parallel processing medium there is - light. Through our unique, patented designs, our systems will be available in the cloud; High Performance Computing (HPC) systems and desktop computers.  Miniaturised systems will also be integrated into mobile systems and even hand held devices, using component technologies that are available today.


Management Team

  Dr. Nick New  CEO, Director, Founder  Nick previously co-founded Cambridge Correlators Limited (the forerunner to Optalysys) and is the driving force behind the technology. Nick graduated from Cambridge University with a doctorate in Optical Pattern Recognition, following his Electrical Engineering degree at Liverpool University.

Dr. Nick New
CEO, Director, Founder

Nick previously co-founded Cambridge Correlators Limited (the forerunner to Optalysys) and is the driving force behind the technology. Nick graduated from Cambridge University with a doctorate in Optical Pattern Recognition, following his Electrical Engineering degree at Liverpool University.

  Emma Blaylock  Chief Commercial Officer, Director  Emma is an experienced business strategist. She holds a degree in Computer Science and an MBA with distinction from Kellogg School of Management. She was formerly a director in Corporate Development and M&A at Sony Corp. of America and management consultant at Deloitte & Touche and Andersen.

Emma Blaylock
Chief Commercial Officer, Director

Emma is an experienced business strategist. She holds a degree in Computer Science and an MBA with distinction from Kellogg School of Management. She was formerly a director in Corporate Development and M&A at Sony Corp. of America and management consultant at Deloitte & Touche and Andersen.

  Robert Todd  Chief Technical Officer  Robert has over 25 years worth of knowledge and experience in the optics industry, 20 years of which were as owner of RDT Precision Optics where he specialised in complex optical component manufacture, and designing and building bespoke optical systems for clients such as CERN, Seagate and BAE systems.

Robert Todd
Chief Technical Officer

Robert has over 25 years worth of knowledge and experience in the optics industry, 20 years of which were as owner of RDT Precision Optics where he specialised in complex optical component manufacture, and designing and building bespoke optical systems for clients such as CERN, Seagate and BAE systems.

 

Scientific Advisory Board

  Prof Douglas Kell  Research Professor of Bioanalytical Science,  University of Manchester  Dr. Kell is a pioneer of using artificial neural networks to solve biological problems. He was also involved in research to create a Robot Scientist (“Adam”) - the world’s first machine to discover new scientific knowledge independently of its human creators. Dr. Kell has received numerous awards including Commander of the Most Excellent Order of the British Empire (CBE). He served as a member and Chief Executive of the U.K. Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research (BBSRC) Council. 

Prof Douglas Kell
Research Professor of Bioanalytical Science, 
University of Manchester

Dr. Kell is a pioneer of using artificial neural networks to solve biological problems. He was also involved in research to create a Robot Scientist (“Adam”) - the world’s first machine to discover new scientific knowledge independently of its human creators. Dr. Kell has received numerous awards including Commander of the Most Excellent Order of the British Empire (CBE). He served as a member and Chief Executive of the U.K. Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research (BBSRC) Council. 

  Dr. Richard Juday  Retired NASA Engineer,    
  
   
   
  
    
  
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  NASA's Johnson Space Center, Houston TX   Dr. Juday was head of the Hybrid Vision Laboratory at NASA where he oversaw image processing and pattern recognition. Other notable work includes a NASA funded project to explore the principles of future space travel technology using White-Juday warp field interferometers. His more than 100 publications include co-authorship of a Cambridge University Press book, Correlation Pattern Recognition. He is a Fellow member of SPIE and of OSA, two international-level optical societies. He holds nine US patents.  

Dr. Richard Juday
Retired NASA Engineer, 
NASA's Johnson Space Center, Houston TX

Dr. Juday was head of the Hybrid Vision Laboratory at NASA where he oversaw image processing and pattern recognition. Other notable work includes a NASA funded project to explore the principles of future space travel technology using White-Juday warp field interferometers. His more than 100 publications include co-authorship of a Cambridge University Press book, Correlation Pattern Recognition. He is a Fellow member of SPIE and of OSA, two international-level optical societies. He holds nine US patents.  

  Prof Timothy Wilkinson  Professor of Photonic Engineering, University of Cambridge  Prof Wilkinson has been working at the University of Cambridge in the field of freespace optics, devices and systems for over 25 years. He developed the binary phase-only matched filter (BPOMF) and 1/f joint transform correlators, and holds several patents. He is currently working on next-generation liquid crystal devices suitable for 3D holographic displays. He holds a doctorate from Magdalene College, University of Cambridge, and has authored over 200 referred journal papers.

Prof Timothy Wilkinson
Professor of Photonic Engineering,
University of Cambridge

Prof Wilkinson has been working at the University of Cambridge in the field of freespace optics, devices and systems for over 25 years. He developed the binary phase-only matched filter (BPOMF) and 1/f joint transform correlators, and holds several patents. He is currently working on next-generation liquid crystal devices suitable for 3D holographic displays. He holds a doctorate from Magdalene College, University of Cambridge, and has authored over 200 referred journal papers.


Our History
 

2018: First product launches

2017: DARPA seedling project completed under the ACCESS program; Innovate UK project with the Earlham Institute successfully completed

2016: Multiplexed correlator designs implemented

2015: Completed re-configurable, lens-less prototype

2015: Awarded Horizon 2020 project with ECMWF

2015: Awarded Innovate UK project in partnership with the Earlham Institute

2014: Designed and patented alignment method for integrating multiple components

2013: Developed lens-less modular optics concept

2013: Shifted focus to big data and model simulations and formed Optalysys

2012: Developed reconfigurable optical processors

2009: Completed optical derivative processor proof of concept

2007: Built and sold “Solid block” rugged lens-less military correlators

2006: First HD SLMs became available in the market

2003: Developed compact Joint Transform Correlator Systems

2001: Cambridge Correlators Spun out from Cambridge University